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Full text of "Mathura A District Memoir"

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2§                                            THE FAMINE 0¥ 1877-78.

Beside the repairs of the roads the other relief works undertaken and
their cost were as follows: the excavation of the Jait tank, Bs. 6,787 ; the
deepening of the Balbhadra tank, Bs. 5,770 ; and the levelling of the Jamalpur
mounds, Bs. 7,238 : these adjoined the Magistrate's Court-house, and will be
frequently mentioned hereafter as ike site of a large Buddhist monastery. On
the llth of May, 1878, the earthwork of the Mathura and Admera Railway
was taken ia hand aixd continued till the beginning of (September* during which
time it gave employment to 713,315 persons, at an expenditure of Bs. 56,639.
An extension of the Mat branch of the Ganges Canal was also commenced on
the 30th July, and employed" 579,351 persons, at a, cost of Bs. 43,142, till its
elo&e on the 16th of October. There should also be added Rs..6,37$, which
were spent by the Municipality through the District Engineer, in levelling
some broken ground opposite the City Police Station. The total cost on all
these relief works thus amounted to Bs, 1,80,630* No remission of revenue
was granted by the Government, bat advances for the purchase of bullocks and
seed were distributed to the extent of Bs. 35,000.*

The following tabular statement shows the mortality that prevailed during
the worst months of this calamitous period : the total population of the district
being 778,839 :—


	f
	s
	1 1
	1
	1
	j
	t
 1
	February.
	i
	1
	*
	J

1877-78..
	973
	1,126
	£32
	1,837
	1,579
	1,973
	1,869
	1,725
	2,018
	vu
	$,189
	* 8,673

1878-79...
	§,562
	W0
	6j&79
	10,414
	I8'"8
	4,710
	2,49)
	1,474
	1,148
	1,611
	MM
	1,661

The metalling of ihe Delhi road, which has been incidentally ijaentioned as
the principal relief work in, 1860, was not only a boon at the time, but still con-
tinues a source of the greatest advantage to the district. The old imperial
thoroughfare, which connected the two capitals of Agi?* and Labor, kept closely
to the same line, as is shown by the ponderous kos nainars^ which are found
still standing at intervals of aboup three miles, and nowhere at any great
* I taw noting of the famine myself, as I left the district in April, 1877, before It had
bepa. SdfiaMy, I am glad to have escaped the sight of so much miser j; though, possibly,.
if I lad 1*een oa the spot* ay local experience might hav® proved useful both Jo Ike Gorenwumt
and th« people.